Get all the quick facts you need to know before your pharmacology exam.

Medication Classifications You’ll Need to Know

  • Antacids – Reduce hydrochloric acid located in the stomach.
  • Antianemics – Increases the production of red blood cells.
  • Anticholinergics – Decreases oral secretions.
  • Anticoagulants – Prevents the formation of clots.
  • Anticonvulsants – Management of seizures or bipolar disorders.
  • Antidiarrheals – Reduce water in bowels and gastric motility.
  • Antihistamines – Blocks the release of histamine.
  • Antihypertensives – Decreases blood pressure.
  • Anti-infectives – To get rid of infections.
  • Bronchodilators – Dilates the bronchi and bronchioles.
  • Diuretics – Increases excretion of water/sodium from body.
  • Laxatives – Loosens stools and increases bowel movements.
  • Miotics – Constricts pupils of the eye.
  • Mydriatics – Dilates the pupils.
  • Narcotics/analgesics – Relieves pain.
NCLEX Pharmacology Classifications
NCLEX Pharmacology Classifications

NCLEX Pharmacology Medical Suffixes

  • -amil = calcium channel blockers
  • -caine = local anesthetics
  • -dine = anti-ulcer agents (H2 histamine blockers)
  • -done = opioid analgesics
  • -ide = oral hypoglycemics
  • -lam = anti-anxiety agents
  • -oxacin = broad spectrum antibiotics
  • -micin = antibiotics
  • -mide = diuretics
  • -mycin = antibiotics
  • -nuim = neuromuscular blockers
  • -olol = beta blockers
  • -pam = anti-anxiety agents
  • -pine = calcium channel blockers
  • -pril = ace inhibitors
  • -sone = steroids
  • -statin =antihyperlipidemics
  • -vir = anti-virais
  • -zide = diuretics
NCLEX Pharmacology Medical Suffixes
NCLEX Pharmacology Medical Suffixes

NCLEX Pharmacology Antidotes

  • Coumadin = Vitamin K
  • Benzodiazepines = Romazicon (Flumazenil)
  • Magnesium Sulfate = Calcium Gluconate
  • Heparin = Protamine Sulfate
  • Tylenol = Mucomyst
  • Opiates = Narcotic analgesics, heroin morphine, Narcan (Naloxone)
  • Cholinergic Meds = Atropine, pralidoxime (2-PAM)
  • Digoxin = Digiband
  • Acetaminophen = n-Acetylcysteine
  • Iron = Deferoxamine
  • Alcohol Withdrawal = Librium
  • Anticholinergics = Physostigmine
  • Beta Blockers = Glucagon
  • Methotrexate = Leucovorin
  • Anticoagulants = Vitamin K, FFP
  • Aspirin = Sodium bicarbonate
  • Calcium Channel Blocker = Calcium, glucagon, insulin
  • Cyanide = Tydroxycobalamin, any nitrite, sodium thiosulfate
  • Hydrofluoric acid = Calcium Gluconate
  • Insulin = Glucose
  • Isoniazid = Deferoxamine
  • Methanol = Ethanol
  • Ethylene glycol = Fomepizole, ethanol
  • Methemoglobin = Methylene blue
  • Tricyclic antidepressant = Sodium bicarbonate
NCLEX Pharmacology Antidotes
NCLEX Pharmacology Antidotes

NCLEX Pharmacology Quick Tips You’ll Need

  • Administer librium during alcohol withdrawal.
  • Antabuse is given for alcohol deterrence. Do not take over the counter cough medicine.
  • When taking hypertensive medications, teach patient about orthostatic hypotension. Patient must change positions slowly.
  • Administer diuretics in the morning so patient doesn’t constantly wake up to urinate.
  • Do not given grapefruits with: Buspar, Veramapmil, Tegretol, and Simvastatin
  • Rifampin turns urination orange.
  • Digoxin = Side effects are increased when the patient is hypokalemic. Monitor the potassium. Digoxin has a negative chronotropic effect (slows the heart rate). Hold the dose if heart rate is less than 60.
  • Digitalis toxicity = bradycardia, tachycardia, dysrhythmias, nausea, vomiting, and headache. Contact physician as soon as possible.
  • MAOIs – Do not give food with tyramine as it may cause hypertensive crisis.
  • Do not give tetracycline at bed time. Do not let patients lie down because it might cause gastric reflux.
  • Do not give metformin to someone having procedures with contrast dye. Metformin can cause acute renal failure.
  • Drawing insulin – (RN), Draw up regular before drawing up NPH.
  • Never give potassium in IV push.
  • When giving loop diuretics, watch for potassium depletion.
  • Disulfiram is given to alcoholics to curb impulsive drinking.
  • Dopamine treats cardiogenic shock.
  • Propranolol is contraindicated in patients with bronchial asthma.
  • Anticholinergic effect – patient won’t be able to spit, pee, poop, or see.
  • Carbamazepine is contraindicated within 14 days of MAOI  administration.
  • Anticoagulant drugs – Monitor PTT for heparin and monitor platelet count, bleeding, and s/s infection.
  • Carafate is taken before meals.
  • Tagamet is taken with food.
  • Antacids is taken after meals.
NCLEX Pharmacology Quick Tips Part I
NCLEX Pharmacology Quick Tips Part I
NCLEX Pharmacology Quick Tips Part II
NCLEX Pharmacology Quick Tips Part II